Sweating? ☀️

Summer.. Heat, Sun, Sweat.

Dehydration can be deadly. Lean how to Beat the Heat:

Heat Stress & Heat-Related Illness

Heat Stress & Heat-Related Illness

What is heat illness?

The body normally cools itself by sweating. During hot weather, especially with high humidity, sweating isn’t enough. Body temperature can rise to dangerous levels if precautions are not taken such as drinking water frequently and resting in the shade or air conditioning. Heat illnesses range from heat rash and heat cramps to heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat stroke requires immediate medical attention and can result in death.

How can heat illness be prevented?

Employers should establish a complete heat illness prevention program to prevent heat illness. This includes: provide workers with water, rest and shade; gradually increase workloads and allow more frequent breaks for new workers or workers who have been away for a week or more to build a tolerance for working in the heat(acclimatization); modify work schedules as necessary; plan for emergencies and train workers about the symptoms of heat-related illnesses and their prevention; and monitor workers for signs of illness. Workers new to the heat or those that have been away from work and are returning can be most vulnerable to heat stress and they must be acclimatized (see box).

To prevent heat related illness and fatalities:

  • Drink water every 15 minutes, even if you are not thirsty.
  • Rest in the shade to cool down.
  • Wear a hat and light-colored clothing.
  • Learn the signs of heat illness and what to do in an emergency.
  • Keep an eye on fellow workers.
  • “Easy does it” on your first days of work in the heat. You need to get used to it.

If workers are new to working in the heat or returning from more than a week off, and for all workers on the first day of a sudden heat wave, implement a work schedule to allow them to get used to the heat gradually. Working in full sunlight can increase heat index values by 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep this in mind and plan additional precautions for working in these conditions.

Remember these three simple words: Water, Rest, Shade. Taking these precautions can mean the difference between life and death.

Who is affected?

Any worker exposed to hot and humid conditions is at risk of heat illness, especially those doing heavy work tasks or using bulky protective clothing and equipment. Some workers might be at greater risk than others if they have not built up a tolerance to hot conditions, including new workers, temporary workers, or those returning to work after a week or more off. This also includes everyone during a heat wave.

Industries most affected by heat-related illness are: construction; trade, transportation and utilities; agriculture; building, grounds maintenance; landscaping services; and support activities for oil and gas operations.

Challenge to control your blood pressure!

Of course High Blood Pressure is one of the leading causes of Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes. but you CAN control it!

Million Hearts launches annual blood pressure control challenge

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services today launched an annual challenge designed to identify and honor clinicians and health care teams that have helped their patients control high blood pressure and prevent heart attacks and strokes.Million-Hearts


The Million Hearts Hypertension Control Challenge recognizes exemplary public and private practices and providers that achieve sustained hypertension control rates of 70 percent or above. The challenge was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in support of Million Hearts, an HHS initiative aimed at preventing 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.


“Many heart attacks and strokes — and needless early deaths — can be prevented if we get better control of high blood pressure,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “We applaud the many medical practices which have made hypertension control a daily priority with all of their patients. We look forward to recognizing their achievements and learning from top performing practices.”


Nearly one in three U.S. adults – or about 70 million people – has high blood pressure. Of that group, only about half has it under control. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, two of the leading causes of death nationwide. In 2013, high blood pressure was a primary or contributing cause of death for more than 360,000 Americans – that is nearly 1,000 deaths each day.


Blood pressure management, a key strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease, is strongly emphasized by Million Hearts. Since 2012, Million Hearts has recognized 41 Champions that care for 12 million patients from small and large, urban and rural, and private, federal, and tribal health practices and systems. Past winners have used a variety of evidence-based strategies including hypertension treatment protocols, self-measured blood pressure monitoring, health information technology, and team-based care.


“A growing number of public and private practices and systems are using evidence-based strategies to detect, connect and control high blood pressure,” said Janet S. Wright, M.D., F.A.C.C., executive director of Million Hearts. “This challenge is a way to find and celebrate these high performers and help others replicate their success. By excelling in hypertension control, Champions are helping prevent events and improving heart health across the country.”


To enter the challenge, applicants must provide information about their practice, share verifiable high blood pressure control data, and describe how use of health information technology contributed to their success. Examples could include electronic health records, incentives for providers and patients, team-based care, and community involvement. The deadline to submit a nomination is before midnight on Oct. 31, 2015.

For more information about the Hypertension Challenge, previous winners or to access resources, visit http://millionhearts.hhs.gov.


About Million Hearts Million Hearts is a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.  Million Hearts brings together communities, health systems, nonprofit organizations, federal agencies, and private-sector partners from across the country to fight heart disease and stroke.


Learn More>>




U.S. Department of Health and Human Services


CDC works 24/7 protecting America’s health, safety and security. Whether diseases start at home or abroad, are curable or preventable, chronic or acute, stem from human error or deliberate attack, CDC is committed to respond to America’s most pressing health challenges.

Are you getting the vaccines you need?

VaccineWe’ve discussed the importance of vaccination… mostly in relation to Child Safety, but what about you, our Adult Reader?

According to the CDC, too few adults are getting the vaccines they need to protect against serious, and sometimes deadly, diseases.

All adults need:

  • Influenza (flu) vaccine every year
  • Td or Tdap vaccine: Every adult should get the Tdap vaccine once if they did not receive it as an adolescent to protect against pertussis (whooping cough), and then a Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years. In addition, women should get the Tdap vaccine each time they are pregnant, preferably at 27 through 36 weeks.

Other vaccines you may need as an adult are determined by factors such as:

  • age
  • lifestyle
  • health conditions
  • job
  • international travel
  • any previous vaccines you have received

Learn more about what other vaccines may be recommended for you and talk to your healthcare professional about which vaccines are right for you.

Positive Attitude = Better Physical Health

Postive AttitudeA growing body of research suggests that having a positive mental outlook might benefit your physical health.

According to the National Institutes for Health (NIH) Positive Emotions and Your Health are Developing a Brighter Outlook .

NIH-funded scientists are working to better understand the links between your attitude and your body. They’re finding some evidence that emotional wellness can be improved by developing certain skills.

Learn more: NIH Positive Emotions and Your Health

We ♥ Our Readers and Customers!

Affirmation Bandages - 20 Per Tin

Affirmation Bandages – 20 Per Tin



We’ve talked about smoking a few times. Understand, we aren’t preaching – in fact, many on our own Team smoke, and have for years. We (including the dedicated smokers here) just want to share information about smoking and the known or perceived health effects so everyone can make their own, informed decisions.

Now, we found this fascinating infographic, we though we would share:smoking-in-gats

Smoking in GATS Countries

Smoking in GATS Countries
688 million people smoke in 22 GATS countries.

What are “GATS Countries”?
It often refers to the 140 World Trade Organization countries that are a part of the General Agreement on Trade in Services… but in this case, the infographic references the Whorls Health Organization (WHO) Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) is a nationally representative household survey that was launched in February 2007 as a new component of the ongoing Global Tobacco Surveillance System (GTSS). The GATS enables countries to collect data on adult tobacco use and key tobacco control measures. Results from the GATS assist countries in the formulation, tracking and implementation of effective tobacco control interventions, and countries are able to compare results of their survey with results from other countries.

Initially, the GATS will be established in the following 16 low- and middle-income countries where more than half of the world’s smokers live and that bear the highest burden of tobacco use: Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Russian Federation, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay and Viet Nam.

Topics covered in GATS:

  • Tobacco use prevalence (smoking and smokeless tobacco products)
  • Second-hand tobacco smoke exposure and policies
  • Cessation
  • Knowledge, attitudes and perceptions
  • Exposure to media
  • Economics


Stroke: What is YOUR risk?

Risk of Stroke, whether TIA (Transient Ischemic Attack*) or full Cerebro Vascular Attacks varies by heredity, lifestyle, and other factors, but trends exist, and knowing your non-controllable risks can help you determine the importance of watching the controllable risk factors.

What is little known is that across all ethnicities, about 20% of strokes occur under the age of 20!

*TIA: A brief stroke-like attack that, despite resolving within minutes to hours, still requires immediate medical attention to distinguish from an actual stroke.

Stroke deaths, by age group and race and Hispanic origin: average annual, 2010–2013:

Stroke by Age

The age distribution of stroke deaths varied by race and Hispanic origin during 2010–2013.

  • More than one-fourth of the stroke deaths among non-Hispanic black persons aged 45 and over (28.6%) occurred to those in the youngest age group (45–64.) By contrast, the portion of stroke deaths in this age group among the other race˗ethnicity groups ranged from one-tenth among non-Hispanic white persons (10.0%) to less than one-fourth among Hispanic persons (22.4%).

Learn how to prevent stroke:

Stroke mortality among adults aged 45 and over varied by race and Hispanic origin and sex during 2010–2013.

  • The age-adjusted stroke death rate for non-Hispanic black men aged 45 and over (154.8 deaths per 100,000 population) was 54% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white men, 67% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander men, and 68% higher than the rate for Hispanic men of the same age.
  • The rate for non-Hispanic black women (131.4 per 100,000 population) was 30% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic white women, 58% higher than the rate for non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander women, and 61% higher than the rate for Hispanic women of the same age.
  • Non-Hispanic Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic men and women had the lowest
    age-adjusted stroke death rates (men: 92.8 and 91.9 per 100,000 population; women: 83.0 and 81.6).
  • Non-Hispanic white men and women aged 45 and over had similar age-adjusted stroke death rates (100.7 and 101.1 deaths per 100,000 population). Men in the other race-ethnicity groups had higher age-adjusted stroke death rates than women of the same race and ethnicity (12% to 18% higher).

Age-adjusted stroke death rates among men and women aged 45 and over, by race and Hispanic origin: average annual, 2010–2013:

Hispanic Stroke

Data from the National Vital Statistics System, Mortality

  • During 2010–2013, the age-adjusted stroke death rate for non-Hispanic black men aged 45 and over (154.8 deaths per 100,000 population) was 54% to 68% higher than the rates for men of the same age in other race-ethnicity groups. The rate for non-Hispanic black women aged 45 and over was 30% to 61% higher than the rates for women of the same age in other race-ethnicity groups.
  • The age distribution of stroke deaths differed by race and ethnicity.
  • Stroke death rates were 32% higher in counties in the lowest median household income quartile than in counties in the highest income quartile.
  • Nonmetropolitan counties had higher stroke death rates than counties at other urbanization levels.
  • Stroke mortality inside and outside the Stroke Belt differed by race and ethnicity.

Despite steady decreases in U.S. stroke mortality over the past several decades, stroke remained the fourth leading cause of death during 2010–2012 and the fifth leading cause in 2013. Most studies have focused on the excess mortality experienced by black persons compared with white persons and by residents of the southeastern states, referred to as the Stroke Belt. Few stroke mortality studies have focused on Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic persons or have explored urban–rural differences. This report provides updated information about stroke mortality among U.S. residents aged 45 and over during 2010–2013 by age, race and ethnicity, income, urban–rural residence, and residence inside or outside the Stroke Belt. Learn more

Extreme Heat and Your Health

It seems to be getting warmer each year. Extreme heat events, or heat waves, are one of the leading causes of weather-related deaths in the United States. When temperatures rise in the summer, extremely hot weather can cause sickness or even death. Heat stress is heat-related illness caused by your body’s inability to cool down properly. The body normally cools itself by sweating. But under some conditions, sweating just isn’t enough. In such cases, a person’s body temperature rises rapidly. Very high body temperatures may damage the brain or other vital organs.

Learn more:


Heat and Heat Related Injuries and Illness ☀️

It’s time to the about Heat Related Injuries again!



Heavy sweating
Cool, pale, clammy skin
Fast, weak pulse
Possible muscle cramps
Nausea or vomiting

First Aid:

Move person to a cooler environment
Lay person down and loosen clothing
Apply cool, wet cloths to as much of the body as possible
Fan or move victim to air conditioned room
Offer sips of water
If person vomits more than once, seek immediate medical attention.



Altered mental state
One or more of the following symptons: throbbing headache, confusion, nausea, dizziness, shallow breathing
Body temperature above 103°F
Hot, red, dry or moist skin
Rapid and strong pulse
Faints, loses consciousness

First Aid:

Heat stroke is a severe medical emergency. Call 911 or get the victim to a hospital immediately. Delay can be fatal.
Move the victim to a cooler, preferably air-conditioned, environment.
Reduce body temperature with cool cloths or bath.
Use fan if heat index temperatures are below the high 90s. A fan can makes you hotter at higher temperatures.
Do NOT give fluids.


Heat cramps may be the first sign of heat-related illness, and may lead to heat exhaustion or stroke.


Painful muscle cramps and spasms usually in legs and abdomen
Heavy sweating

First Aid:

Apply firm pressure on cramping muscles or gently massage to relieve spasm.
Give sips of water unless the person complains of nausea, then stop giving water

Heat Stress & Heat-Related Illness

Heat Stress & Heat-Related Illness

Hot Weather Health Emergencies


You’ve gotten your Summer First Aid Kit,

You’ve Slathered on the Sunscreen,

You’ve Reviewed your Summer Safety Tips,

You’ve even Read all about Electrolytes,

Now what?

Photo of thermometer measuring high temperature.Even short periods of high temperatures can cause serious health problems. During hot weather health emergencies, keep informed by listening to local weather and news channels or contact local health departments for health and safety updates. Doing too much on a hot day, spending too much time in the sun or staying too long in an overheated place can cause heat-related illnesses. Know the symptoms of heat disorders and overexposure to the sun, and be ready to give first aid treatment.

Heat Stroke

Heat stroke occurs when the body is unable to regulate its temperature. The body’s temperature rises rapidly, the sweating mechanism fails, and the body is unable to cool down. Body temperature may rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided.

Recognizing Heat Stroke

Warning signs of heat stroke vary but may include the following:

  • An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F, orally)
  • Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)
  • Rapid, strong pulse
  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Confusion
  • Unconsciousness

What to Do

If you see any of these signs, you may be dealing with a life-threatening emergency. Have someone call for immediate medical assistance while you begin cooling the victim. Do the following:

  • Get the victim to a shady area.
  • Cool the victim rapidly using whatever methods you can. For example, immerse the victim in a tub of cool water; place the person in a cool shower; spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose; sponge the person with cool water; or if the humidity is low, wrap the victim in a cool, wet sheet and fan him or her vigorously.
  • Monitor body temperature, and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102°F.
  • If emergency medical personnel are delayed, call the hospital emergency room for further instructions.
  • Do not give the victim fluids to drink.
  • Get medical assistance as soon as possible.

Sometimes a victim’s muscles will begin to twitch uncontrollably as a result of heat stroke. If this happens, keep the victim from injuring himself, but do not place any object in the mouth and do not give fluids. If there is vomiting, make sure the airway remains open by turning the victim on his or her side.

Heat Exhaustion

Photo of man exhausted from playing tennis.Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids. It is the body’s response to an excessive loss of the water and salt contained in sweat. Those most prone to heat exhaustion are elderly people, people with high blood pressure, and people working or exercising in a hot environment.

Recognizing Heat Exhaustion

Warning signs of heat exhaustion include the following:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Paleness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fainting

The skin may be cool and moist. The victim’s pulse rate will be fast and weak, and breathing will be fast and shallow. If heat exhaustion is untreated, it may progress to heat stroke. Seek medical attention immediately if any of the following occurs:

  • Symptoms are severe
  • The victim has heart problems or high blood pressure

Otherwise, help the victim to cool off, and seek medical attention if symptoms worsen or last longer than 1 hour.

What to Do

Cooling measures that may be effective include the following:

  • Cool, nonalcoholic beverages
  • Rest
  • Cool shower, bath, or sponge bath
  • An air-conditioned environment
  • Lightweight clothing

Heat Cramps

Heat cramps usually affect people who sweat a lot during strenuous activity. This sweating depletes the body’s salt and moisture. The low salt level in the muscles may be the cause of heat cramps. Heat cramps may also be a symptom of heat exhaustion.

Recognizing Heat Cramps

Heat cramps are muscle pains or spasms—usually in the abdomen, arms, or legs—that may occur in association with strenuous activity. If you have heart problems or are on a low-sodium diet, get medical attention for heat cramps.

What to Do

If medical attention is not necessary, take these steps:

  • Stop all activity, and sit quietly in a cool place.
  • Drink clear juice or a sports beverage.
  • Do not return to strenuous activity for a few hours after the cramps subside, because further exertion may lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke.
  • Seek medical attention for heat cramps if they do not subside in 1 hour.


Photo of sun bather.Sunburn should be avoided because it damages the skin. Although the discomfort is usually minor and healing often occurs in about a week, a more severe sunburn may require medical attention.

Recognizing Sunburn

Symptoms of sunburn are well known: the skin becomes red, painful, and abnormally warm after sun exposure.

What to Do

Consult a doctor if the sunburn affects an infant younger than 1 year of age or if these symptoms are present:

  • Fever
  • Fluid-filled blisters
  • Severe pain

Also, remember these tips when treating sunburn:

  • Avoid repeated sun exposure.
  • Apply cold compresses or immerse the sunburned area in cool water.
  • Apply moisturizing lotion to affected areas. Do not use salve, butter, or ointment.
  • Do not break blisters.

Heat Rash

Photo of woman's face sweating.Heat rash is a skin irritation caused by excessive sweating during hot, humid weather. It can occur at any age but is most common in young children.

Recognizing Heat Rash

Heat rash looks like a red cluster of pimples or small blisters. It is more likely to occur on the neck and upper chest, in the groin, under the breasts, and in elbow creases.

What to Do

The best treatment for heat rash is to provide a cooler, less humid environment. Keep the affected area dry. Dusting powder may be used to increase comfort.

Treating heat rash is simple and usually does not require medical assistance. Other heat-related problems can be much more severe.

Beat the Heat ☀️

Feel the Heat? Beat it!

Humidity is a whopper, too!

Spending time in the sun on vacation?  Heat related illness is a possibility if you don’t take certain precautions. Beat the Heat!

Learn More:

North American summers are hot; most summers see heat waves in one or more parts of the United States. Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year and even more heat-related illnesses.Beat-the-Heat9


#HeatSafety #BeattheHeat #WRW